Wellbeing

Why Wellbeing?

The increasing rate of anxiety and depression in young people across Australia is well documented in research. This research also tells us that wellbeing is inextricably linked to successful learning, personal achievement, social competence, and emotional resilience and that schools play a key role in the promotion of positive mental health within the wider community.

Students who are positive, resilient, hopeful, aware of the contribution they can make in the world and successful in creating meaningful relationships, are best placed to achieve positive learning outcomes, to be the best version of themselves and be fit for life.


Why Wellbeing Graphic 190327


Our Wellbeing Strategy at a Glance

Wellbeing Strategy Infographic



For well over a century, the magnolia tree located in the School grounds has graciously stood the test of time. It is a rich metaphor that has deep spiritual and historical significance for our School. This magnolia tree is incorporated in the FitforLife logo, symbolising resilience, a flourishing soul and the rhythmic seasons of life.

Wheel of Wellbeing

The School’s Wheel of Wellbeing is a three-tiered circular model that can be rotated to explore the scientific ‘Ways to Wellbeing’ that lead to a flourishing life. This tactile approach is an investment in developing our community’s understanding of our whole school strategic approach to building individual and collective wellbeing.



The Inner Layer:

At our core, we are spiritual beings. Spiritual wellbeing is reflected in the relationships we have with God, oneself, others, and the environment. Spiritual wellbeing acts as a springboard for other dimensions of wellbeing.

The Middle Layer:

Wellbeing is multidimensional. Our framework builds and supports wellbeing in our community through interventions that target Emotional, Social, Intellectual and Physical pathways to wellbeing.

The Outer Layer:

These represent “Ways to Wellbeing”; the attributes, skills and circumstances that facilitate personal achievement, social competence and emotional resilience.


Sources

1. The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (2018), PISA Key Findings for Australia
2. Mission Australia Youth Survey Report (2018)
3. Young Minds Matter Australia (2015)
4. Australian Bureau of Statistics, Causes of Death, Australia, 2017 (2018). Preliminary data. Suicide (Australia).
5. Wellbeing, Recovery and Mental Health, Ed. Slade, M., Oades, L., Jarden, A., (2017), Visible Wellbeing and Positive Functioning in Students, (Waters, L. et al); Ch. 20, Cambridge University Press 978-1-107-54305-8
6. Hoare, E., Bott, D., & Robinson, J. (2017). Learn it, Live it, Teach it, Embed it: Implementing a whole school approach to foster positive mental health and wellbeing through Positive Education. International Journal of Wellbeing, 7(3), 56-71. doi:10.5502/ijw.v7i3.645
7. Rossouw, P.J., (2014), Neuropsychotherapy: Theoretical Underpinnings and Clinical Applications
8. Wellbeing, Recovery and Mental Health, Ed. Slade, M., Oades, L., Jarden, A., (2017), Visible Wellbeing and Positive Functioning in Students, (Waters, L. et al); Ch. 20, Cambridge University Press 978-1-107-54305-8